Military History

Blogging about the Battlefield since 2005

Archive for the ‘Conflict’ Category

Articles dealing with conflict in general.

KVRR Fox Fargo Moorhead – WW II Collection On Display At UND

Posted by Daniel Sauerwein on February 5, 2013

KVRR Fox Fargo Moorhead – WW II Collection On Display At UND.

A local news story about an exhibit I put together on the 164th Infantry Regiment, which was part of the North Dakota National Guard and served in the Pacific as part of the Americal Division.

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Posted in 20th Century Military History, American Military History, Conflict, US Army, World War II | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The First World War: the war that changed us all

Posted by Daniel Sauerwein on October 14, 2012

Great article from the Telegraph, posted to History News Network

The First World War: the war that changed us all.

SOURCE: Telegraph (UK) (10-11-12)

The very last combat veteran of the First World War, Claude “Chuckles” Choules of the Royal Navy, died in an Australian nursing home last year, aged 110. The last non-combat veteran, Florence Green, an RAF steward, died this February in King’s Lynn, also aged 110.

So the First World War has almost entirely deserted living memory. And yet its memory stays strong – and grows ever stronger – among those born decades after it ended. More than 300,000 people still visit the battlefields in northern France every year. First World War dramas come thick and fast: Parade’s End, Downton Abbey, that revered, much-repeated last scene in Blackadder.

Literature, too, goes back and back to the trenches. Pat Barker has just published Toby’s Room, a First World War novel, 21 years after Regeneration, the first book in her war trilogy. Yesterday, David Cameron talked of how Michael Morpurgo’s War Horse and the novels of Sebastian Faulks have kept the First World War vivid for new generations….

Posted in 20th Century Military History, Conflict, World War I | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

For Love of Liberty: The Story of America’s Black Patriots

Posted by Daniel Sauerwein on October 14, 2010

I received information about this resource a few weeks ago and have meant to post it up here. For Love of Liberty tells the story of African-American contributions to America’s military history. The website will be closing soon, due to an apparent lack of funding, so go there soon to check out photos and other materials. I am making available chapters of the documentary and the film, including facilitator guides, so that this information is available to educators. Below is information about this program.

The website:

http://www.forloveofliberty.net/

You can download the facilitator guides at this link: (I have attached them for you)

http://www.forloveofliberty.net/educators/facilitators-guides

For Love of Liberty Documentary Links:

Chapter 1: Introduction

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=8MH2M6FT

Chapter 2: The Revolution

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=DCBNTI26

Chapter 3: The Civil War

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=91G9WPUR

Chapter 4: WWI

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=XNCBIKH9

Chapter 5: WWII

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=SJKIMAZG

Chapter 6: The Korean War

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=65YPE8LZ

Chapter 7: The Vietnam War

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=G9YJT4V2

Chapter 8: The Middle East

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=LM5DB80G

Chapter 9: Conclusion

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=BQ98URBM

Play All:

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=S6EG13VM

You can view photos here.

Please check out this information and consider showing it to students.

Posted in 20th Century Military History, 21st Century Military History, American Military History, Cold War, Conflict, General, Global War on Terror, Gulf War/Operation Desert Shield/Storm, Indian Wars, Korean War, Spanish-American War, US Air Force, US Army, US Coast Guard, US Marine Corps, US military, US Navy, Vietnam War, World War I, World War II | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

Combat Stress Clinic named after fallen Soldier

Posted by Daniel Sauerwein on September 16, 2010

Courtesy of Captain Tanya Rosa

United States Division – South
Media Release
HQ, USD-South
Basra, Iraq
APO AE 09374
VOIP: 858-4087

RELEASE 20100910-01                                                                                                                                                                      Sep. 10, 2010

Combat Stress Clinic named after fallen Soldier

By Sgt. Cody Harding, 1st Inf. Div. PAO

BASRA, Iraq – The new Combat Stress Clinic on the American base at Basra International Airport was named in honor of Sgt. Brandon Maggart in a ceremony Sept. 10.

Maggart, who served with Battery A, 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, was killed in an Aug. 22 rocket attack.

The clinic, which was recently refurbished, provides a place for Soldiers to meet with mental health professionals to deal with the stress that comes with operating in a combat zone. Controlling stress is an important part of the military’s overall fitness, and the support center aims to help Soldiers cope.

The Combat Stress Clinic renovations, under the direction of Sgt. Sonja Young, a behavioral health technician with the 162nd Area Medical Support Group, were completed the day before the attack. After helping the Soldiers in Maggart’s unit, Young, a San Antonio native, advocated that the new CSC be named after him.

Lt. Col. Pamela Breedlove, the commander of the Combat Stress Clinic, said Maggart’s leadership was the reason behind his name being placed on the clinic.

“As Sgt. Maggart truly exemplifies the Army Values, Soldier Resiliency, and the tenets of combat stress control,” said Breedlove, a Topeka, Kan., native. “Sgt. Young advocated that the new clinic area be dedicated in his name.”

Before the renovations, the CSC was an unattractive place for Soldiers to visit. The building would often become too hot inside to be comfortable, and thin walls kept many discussions from being confidential.
The building was improved by adding new air conditioning units, increasing the thickness of the walls, and remodeling the inside of the clinic.

Sgt. Jose Carrera, a Phoenix native serving as the 1st Inf. Div. behavioral health NCO, said the improved atmosphere helps Soldiers open up to the staff.

“Staff members are able to do their job better,” Carrera said. “Just by improving the environment of the clinic helps improve the Soldier’s [ability] to open up and be able to disclose more things the staff can use to help.”
Breedlove said the renovations to the clinic help her and her Soldiers do their jobs more effectively.

“We’re here for all Soldiers,” Breedlove said. “It is our role to do what we can to help Soldiers and return them to duty.”

Carrera described the CSC and caring for the needs of the Soldiers under stress as a force multiplier.

“When you have Soldiers coming in and are able to receive the treatment they need, they go back to their units and become more resourceful, more effective, and therefore able to carry out the mission,” Carrera said.

The clinic is situated across from the Troop Medical Clinic and is open Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon.

From left, Maj. Gen. Vincent Brooks, the United States Division – South commanding general, Lt. Col. Pamela Breedlove, the Combat Stress Clinic commanding officer, and Capt. Lloyd Sporluck, commander of Battery A, 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment,  unveil the placard dedicating the facility to Sgt. Brandon Maggart Sept. 10. (Photo by Sgt. Cody Harding, 1st Infantry Division Public Affairs.)

Spc. Devin Swanson, a Soldier in Battery A, 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, left, and Staff Sgt. Joshua Medina, also with 5-5 ADA, stand beside the plaque to commemorate the dedication of the Combat Stress Clinic Sept. 10. The clinic is used to help Soldiers deal with stress of a combat zone. (Photo by Sgt. Cody Harding, 1st Inf. Div. Public Affairs.)

For queries, contact the United States Division – South Public Affairs at USD-S_PAO@iraq.centcom.mil; by phone at (Iraqna) 0790-194-2865 or 770-263-9379. For more USDS news, visit our website: www.dangerforward.us.

Posted in 21st Century Military History, American Military History, Conflict, Global War on Terror, US Army, US military | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Review of Radioman: An Eyewitness Account of Pearl Harbor and World War II in the Pacific

Posted by William F. Sauerwein on September 14, 2010

Radioman:  An Eyewitness Account of Pearl Harbor and World War II in the Pacific by Carol Edgemon Hipperson.  Published by Thomas Dunne Books, St. Martin’s Minotaur of New York, copyright in 2008.

Review by William F. Sauerwein, 1SG, US Army (Retired).  B.S., Historical Studies from Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (SIUE) in 2004.

This book proved truly informative and provided several experiences seldom explored in World War II history.  I thoroughly enjoyed the “oral account” of an individual sailor, without the psychoanalysis (or “psycho-babble”) of an academic with a Ph. D.  The book covers the life of a young man coming of age during a bleak time in our history, the Great Depression.  He survived that and then, like the rest of his generation, endured the sacrifices required for winning World War II.  Radioman further reveals that even during the national mobilization of World War II individual Americans still worked toward their individual goals.  It also reveals the harsh lessons and sacrifices of ignoring the threats of “rogue nations” and ignoring military readiness in the face of these threats.  An entire generation of Americans sacrificed, on the battlefields and the home front, for preserving this nation.  Today those remaining of that generation die from the infirmities of that sacrifice and “old age,” taking their experience with them.  We, the heirs of what they fought and died for, owe them the respect of learning from their experiences, and heeding their warnings.

The book covers the adult life of Ray Daves, originally from Vilonia, Arkansas, near Little Rock.  It begins a timeline in June, 1936, a time of steadily increasing tensions in the world.  Sixteen-year-old Daves typified the experiences of a generation of young Americans, who faced an uncertain future.  He embarked upon the world after quitting high school following his sophomore year, the “tenth grade.”  Describing himself as the “renegade” of the family’s seven children he expressed dissatisfaction with his future on the family farm.  As a “farm boy” myself, I fully understand the longing for life beyond the cornfields.

Daves recounts his life in an America that the majority of Americans today do not understand, even given today’s situation.  He states that Americans then did not call it the Great Depression, instead labeling it “hard times.”  During these times everyone focused on their families and sacrificed their individual dreams for helping their family survive.  While today’s youth put off adult responsibilities as long as possible, Daves’ generation lacked that luxury.  Older children, like Daves, quit school and took whatever jobs available, even if it took them far from home.  The phrase “jobs that Americans won’t do” did not exist at that time, something today’s “entitlement mentality” cannot comprehend.  As Daves reveals, married men also journeyed far from home for any job and sent their families the money.

The first stop in Daves’ journey took him into a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp in Idaho.  He describes the CCC as one of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s (FDR) “New Deal” programs.  The historical notes identify the CCC as FDR’s first and most popular program and the first organized attempt at preserving the environment.  Daves explains the hard work they performed in the parks and forests, building irrigation ditches for farmers and work on the infrastructure.  When a Baptist youth group from Spokane, Washington conducted a church service at the camp Daves met his future wife, Adeline.

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Posted in 20th Century Military History, American Military History, Conflict, US military, US Navy, World War II | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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